Tuesday, 15 March 2011

sexual problems,sexual dysfunction,erictile dysfunction,sexual dysfunction related with diabietes,diabietic neuropathy ,disire dysfunction,male importancy,female importancy,sex hormone disbalance,sex weakness diseases

 

sexual problems,sexual dysfunction,erictile dysfunction,disire dysfunction,male importancy,female importancy,sex hormone disbalance,sex weakness disea

dr vinod raina,mbbs,md medicine from swaintpeters burg in 2001
mobile :+919871605858
mobile :+919136363692
e mail:decent_doctor_30@yahoo.com
227 a arjun nagar safdharjung enclave new delhi
A sexual problem, or sexual dysfunction, refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. The sexual response cycle has four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

While research suggests that sexual dysfunction is common (43% of women and 31% of men report some degree of difficulty), it is a topic that many people are hesitant to discuss. Fortunately, most cases of sexual dysfunction are treatable, so it is important to share your concerns with your partner and doctor.

What causes sexual problems?
Sexual dysfunction can be a result of a physical or psychological problem.

* Physical causes -- Many physical and/or medical conditions can cause problems with sexual function. These conditions include diabetes, heart and vascular (blood vessel) disease, neurological disorders, hormonal imbalances, chronic diseases such as kidney or liver failure, and alcoholism and drug abuse. In addition, the side effects of certain medications, including some antidepressant drugs, can affect sexual desire and function.
* Psychological causes -- These include work-related stress and anxiety, concern about sexual performance, marital or relationship problems, depression, feelings of guilt, and the effects of a past sexual trauma.
Who is affected by sexual problems?
Both men and women are affected by sexual problems. Sexual problems occur in adults of all ages. Among those commonly affected are those in the geriatric population, which may be related to a decline in health associated with aging.

How do sexual problems affect men?
The most common sexual problems in men are ejaculation disorders, erectile dysfunction, and inhibited sexual desire.

What are ejaculation disorders?
There are different types of ejaculation disorders, including:

* Premature ejaculation -- This refers to ejaculation that occurs before or soon after penetration.
* Inhibited or retarded ejaculation -- This is when ejaculation is slow to occur.
* Retrograde ejaculation -- This occurs when, at orgasm, the ejaculate is forced back into the bladder rather than through the urethra and out the end of the penis.

In some cases, premature and inhibited ejaculation are caused by a lack of attraction for a partner, past traumatic events and psychological factors, including a strict religious background that causes the person to view sex as sinful. Premature ejaculation, the most common form of sexual dysfunction in men, often is due to nervousness over how well he will perform during sex. Certain drugs, including some anti-depressants, may affect ejaculation, as can nerve damage to the spinal cord or back.

Retrograde ejaculation is common in males with diabetes who suffer from diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage). This is due to problems with the nerves in the bladder and the bladder neck that allow the ejaculate to flow backward and into the bladder. In other men, retrograde ejaculation occurs after operations on the bladder neck or prostate, or after certain abdominal operations. In addition, certain medications, particularly those used to treat mood disorders, may cause problems with ejaculation. This generally does not require treatment unless it impairs fertili

What is erectile dysfunction?
Also known as impotence, erectile dysfunction is defined as the inability to attain and/or maintain an erection suitable for intercourse. Causes of erectile dysfunction include diseases affecting blood flow, such as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries); nerve disorders; psychological factors, such as stress, depression, and performance anxiety (nervousness over his ability to sexually perform); and injury to the penis. Chronic illness, certain medications, and a condition called Peyronie's disease (scar tissue in the penis) also can cause erectile dysfunction.

What is inhibited sexual desire?
Inhibited desire, or loss of libido, refers to a decrease in desire for, or interest in sexual activity. Reduced libido can result from physical or psychological factors. It has been associated with low levels of the hormone testosterone. It also may be caused by psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression; medical illnesses, such as diabetes and high blood pressure; certain medications, including some anti-depressants; and relationship difficulties.

How Are Male Sexual Problems Diagnosed?
The doctor likely will begin with a thorough history of symptoms. He or she may order other tests to rule out any medical problems that may be contributing to the dysfunction. The doctor may refer you to other doctors, including a urologist (a doctor specializing in the urinary tract and male reproductive system), an endocrinologist (a doctor specializing in glandular disorders), a neurologist (a doctor specializing in disorders of the nervous system), sex therapists and other counselors

What tests are used to evaluate sexual problems?

Several tests can be used to evaluate the causes and extent of sexual problems. They include:

* Blood tests -- These tests are done to evaluate hormone levels.
* Vascular assessment -- This involves an evaluation of the blood flow to the penis. A blockage in a blood vessel supplying blood to the penis may be contributing to erectile dysfunction.
* Sensory testing -- Particularly useful in evaluating the effects of diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage), sensory testing measures the strength of nerve impulses in a particular area of the body.
* Nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing -- This test is used to monitor erections that occur naturally during sleep. This test can help determine if a man's erectile problems are due to physical or psychological causes.

How is male sexual dysfunction treated?
Many cases of sexual dysfunction can be corrected by treating the underlying physical or psychological problems. Treatment strategies may include the following:

* Medical treatment -- This involves treatment of any physical problem that may be contributing to a man's sexual dysfunction.
* Medications -- Medications, such as Cialis, Viagra or Levitra , may help improve sexual function in men by increasing blood flow to the penis.
* Hormones -- Men with low levels of testosterone may benefit from hormone supplementation (testosterone replacement therapy).
* Psychological therapy -- Therapy with a trained counselor can help a person address feelings of anxiety, fear or guilt that may have an impact on sexual function.
* Mechanical aids -- Aids such as vacuum devices and penile implants may help men with erectile dysfunction.
* Education and communication -- Education about sex and sexual behaviors and responses may help a man overcome his anxieties about sexual performance. Open dialogue with your partner about your needs and concerns also helps to overcome many barriers to a healthy sex life.

Can sexual problems be cured?
The success of treatment for sexual dysfunction depends on the underlying cause of the problem. The outlook is good for dysfunction that is related to a treatable or reversible physical condition. Mild dysfunction that is related to stress, fear, or anxiety often can be successfully treated with counseling, education, and improved communication between partners.

Can sexual problems be prevented?
While sexual problems cannot be prevented, dealing with the underlying causes of the dysfunction can help you better understand and cope with the problem when it occurs. There are some things you can do to help maintain good sexual function:

* Follow your doctor's treatment plan for any medical/health conditions.
* Limit your alcohol intake.
* Quit smoking.
* Deal with any emotional or psychological issues such as stress, depression, and anxiety. Get treatment as needed.
* Increase communication with your partner.

When should I call my doctor?
Many men experience a problem with sexual function from time to time. However, when the problems are persistent, they can cause distress for the man and his partner, and have a negative impact on their relationship. If you consistently experience sexual function problems, see your doctor for evaluation and treatment.

Reviewed by the doctors at The Cleveland Clinic Urological Institute.

Featured: Sexual (Sex) Problems in Men Main Article
Male sexual dysfunction can be caused by physical or psychological problems. Common sexual problems in men include erectile dysfunction (impotence or ED), premature ejaculation and loss of libido. Treatment for sexual dysfunction in men may involve medication, hormone therapy, psychological therapy, and the use of mechanical aids.
Medications

* sildenafil, Viagra

Doctor's & Expert's Views

* Hospitals: Can Yours Handle Your Emergency?
* Mental Health: Questions to Ask When Choosing a Provider and Doctor

Procedures & Tests

* Vasectomy

Health News

* Topical Treatment May Ease Erectile Dysfunction
* Topical Spray Helped Men With Premature Ejaculation
* Masturbation and Prostate Cancer Risk
* Statins Might Reverse ED in Some Men

View All 9 Sexual (Sex) Problems in Men Health News »
Ask the Experts

* Stress Can Lower Your Sex Drive

Related Diseases & Conditions

* High Blood Pressure
* Stress
* Depression
* Erectile Dysfunction (Impotence)

View All 11 Sexual (Sex) Problems in Men Related Diseases & Conditions »
Health Features

* 5 Things You Didn't Know About Your Penis
* Erection Problem Checklist
* Male Enhancement: Is It Worth a Try?
* High Blood Pressure: When Is It Erectile Dysfunction?

Tools & References

* AIDS Retrospective Pictures Slideshow: A Pictorial Timeline of the HIV/AIDS Pandemic
* Doctor: Checklist to Take To Your Doctor's Appointment
* How to Choose a Doctor
* Doctor: Getting the Most from Your Doctor's Appointment

Glossary

* Sexual (Sex) Problems in Men Glossary

if u feel any problem pl feel free to call me on +91 9871605858
dr vinod raina
md internal medicine
posted by drvinod at 6:12 AM 0 comments

Saturday, June 14, 2008
Introduction

A sexual problem, or sexual dysfunction, refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. The sexual response cycle has four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

While research suggests that sexual dysfunction is common (43% of women and 31% of men report some degree of difficulty), it is a topic that many people are hesitant to discuss. Fortunately, most cases of sexual dysfunction are treatable, so it is important to share your concerns with your partner and doctor.

What causes sexual problems?

Sexual dysfunction can be a result of a physical or psychological problem.

* Physical causes -- Many physical and/or medical conditions can cause problems with sexual function. These conditions include diabetes, heart and vascular (blood vessel) disease, neurological disorders, hormonal imbalances, chronic diseases such as kidney or liver failure, and alcoholism and drug abuse. In addition, the side effects of certain medications, including some antidepressant drugs, can affect sexual desire and function.
* Psychological causes -- These include work-related stress and anxiety, concern about sexual performance, marital or relationship problems, depression, feelings of guilt, and the effects of a past sexual trauma.



Who is affected by sexual problems?

Both men and women are affected by sexual problems. Sexual problems occur in adults of all ages. Among those commonly affected are those in the geriatric population, which may be related to a decline in health associated with aging.

How do sexual problems affect men?

The most common sexual problems in men are ejaculation disorders, erectile dysfunction, and inhibited sexual desire.

What are ejaculation disorders?

There are different types of ejaculation disorders, including:

* Premature ejaculation -- This refers to ejaculation that occurs before or soon after penetration.
* Inhibited or retarded ejaculation -- This is when ejaculation is slow to occur.
* Retrograde ejaculation -- This occurs when, at orgasm, the ejaculate is forced back into the bladder rather than through the urethra and out the end of the penis.

In some cases, premature and inhibited ejaculation are caused by a lack of attraction for a partner, past traumatic events and psychological factors, including a strict religious background that causes the person to view sex as sinful. Premature ejaculation, the most common form of sexual dysfunction in men, often is due to nervousness over how well he will perform during sex. Certain drugs, including some anti-depressants, may affect ejaculation, as can nerve damage to the spinal cord or back.

Retrograde ejaculation is common in males with diabetes who suffer from diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage). This is due to problems with the nerves in the bladder and the bladder neck that allow the ejaculate to flow backward and into the bladder. In other men, retrograde ejaculation occurs after operations on the bladder neck or prostate, or after certain abdominal operations. In addition, certain medications, particularly those used to treat mood disorders, may cause problems with ejaculation. This generally does not require treatment unless it impairs fertility.



What is erectile dysfunction?

Also known as impotence, erectile dysfunction is defined as the inability to attain and/or maintain an erection suitable for intercourse. Causes of erectile dysfunction include diseases affecting blood flow, such as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries); nerve disorders; psychological factors, such as stress, depression, and performance anxiety (nervousness over his ability to sexually perform); and injury to the penis. Chronic illness, certain medications, and a condition called Peyronie's disease (scar tissue in the penis) also can cause erectile dysfunction.

What is inhibited sexual desire?

Inhibited desire, or loss of libido, refers to a decrease in desire for, or interest in sexual activity. Reduced libido can result from physical or psychological factors. It has been associated with low levels of the hormone testosterone. It also may be caused by psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression; medical illnesses, such as diabetes and high blood pressure; certain medications, including some anti-depressants; and relationship difficulties.

How Are Male Sexual Problems Diagnosed?

The doctor likely will begin with a thorough history of symptoms. He or she may order other tests to rule out any medical problems that may be contributing to the dysfunction. The doctor may refer you to other doctors, including a urologist (a doctor specializing in the urinary tract and male reproductive system), an endocrinologist (a doctor specializing in glandular disorders), a neurologist (a doctor specializing in disorders of the nervous system), sex therapists and other counselors.



What tests are used to evaluate sexual problems?

Several tests can be used to evaluate the causes and extent of sexual problems. They include:

* Blood tests -- These tests are done to evaluate hormone levels.
* Vascular assessment -- This involves an evaluation of the blood flow to the penis. A blockage in a blood vessel supplying blood to the penis may be contributing to erectile dysfunction.
* Sensory testing -- Particularly useful in evaluating the effects of diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage), sensory testing measures the strength of nerve impulses in a particular area of the body.
* Nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing -- This test is used to monitor erections that occur naturally during sleep. This test can help determine if a man's erectile problems are due to physical or psychological causes.

How is male sexual dysfunction treated?

Many cases of sexual dysfunction can be corrected by treating the underlying physical or psychological problems. Treatment strategies may include the following:

* Medical treatment -- This involves treatment of any physical problem that may be contributing to a man's sexual dysfunction.
* Medications -- Medications, such as Cialis, Viagra or Levitra , may help improve sexual function in men by increasing blood flow to the penis.
* Hormones -- Men with low levels of testosterone may benefit from hormone supplementation (testosterone replacement therapy).
* Psychological therapy -- Therapy with a trained counselor can help a person address feelings of anxiety, fear or guilt that may have an impact on sexual function.
* Mechanical aids -- Aids such as vacuum devices and penile implants may help men with erectile dysfunction.
* Education and communication -- Education about sex and sexual behaviors and responses may help a man overcome his anxieties about sexual performance. Open dialogue with your partner about your needs and concerns also helps to overcome many barriers to a healthy sex life.


Can sexual problems be cured?

The success of treatment for sexual dysfunction depends on the underlying cause of the problem. The outlook is good for dysfunction that is related to a treatable or reversible physical condition. Mild dysfunction that is related to stress, fear, or anxiety often can be successfully treated with counseling, education, and improved communication between partners.

Can sexual problems be prevented?

While sexual problems cannot be prevented, dealing with the underlying causes of the dysfunction can help you better understand and cope with the problem when it occurs. There are some things you can do to help maintain good sexual function:

* Follow your doctor's treatment plan for any medical/health conditions.
* Limit your alcohol intake.
* Quit smoking.
* Deal with any emotional or psychological issues such as stress, depression, and anxiety. Get treatment as needed.
* Increase communication with your partner.

When should I call my doctor?

Many men experience a problem with sexual function from time to time. However, when the problems are persistent, they can cause distress for the man and his partner, and have a negative impact on their relationship. If you consistently experience sexual function problems, see your doctor for evaluation and treatment.
 

ORGASM disorders

Anorgasmia (material from wicpedia)
for treat ment pl cal +91-9871605858 dr vinod raina

Anorgasmia (often related to delayed ejaculation in males) is a form of sexual dysfunction sometimes classified as a psychiatric disorder in which the patient cannot achieve orgasm, even with adequate stimulation. However, it can also be caused by medical problems such as diabetic neuropathy, multiple sclerosis, genital mutilation or complications from genital surgery, pelvic trauma, hormonal imbalances, total hysterectomy, spinal cord injury and cardiovascular disease. Anorgasmia is far more common in females than in males and is especially rare in younger men. Anorgasmia is the medical term for regular difficulty reaching orgasm after ample sexual stimulation, often causing significant sexual frustration. About 15% of women report difficulties with orgasm, and as many as 10% of women in the United States have never climaxed. Many women who orgasm regularly only climax about 50-70% of the time.

A common cause of anorgasmia, in both men and women, is the use of anti-depressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Though reporting of anorgasmia as a side-effect of SSRIs is not precise, it is estimated that 15-50% of users of such medications are affected by this condition[citation needed]. The chemical amantadine has been shown to relieve SSRI-induced anorgasmia in some, but not all, people.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Primary anorgasmia
* 2 Secondary anorgasmia
* 3 Situational anorgasmia
* 4 Random anorgasmia
* 5 Treatment
* 6 See also
* 7 References
* 8 External links
Primary anorgasmia

Primary anorgasmia is a condition where one has never experienced an orgasm. This is significantly more common in women, although it can occur in men who lack the gladipudendal (bulbocavernosus) reflex.[1]

Women with this condition can sometimes achieve a relatively low level of sexual excitement and may think of intercourse or other sexual activities as pleasant despite their inability to orgasm. They may get most of their reward from touching, holding, kissing, caressing, attention, and approval. However, women who regularly achieve high levels of sexual response without orgasmic release of tension may find the experience frustrating. Emotional irritability, restlessness, and pelvic pain or a heavy pelvic sensation may occur because of vascular engorgement.

Often, though, there is no obvious reason why orgasm is unobtainable. Regardless of having a caring, skilled partner, having adequate time and privacy, and having no medical issues which would affect sexual satisfaction, some women are unable to orgasm. This situation is extremely frustrating because with no discernible cause, a plausible solution is difficult to discover.[citation needed] From a biological standpoint, there is no known selective advantage that accrues either to women who experience orgasm, or to those who do not. Both are equally capable of reproducing in that both are equally likely to conceive upon intercourse. However, it is possible that anorgasmic women may be less interested in having sex; a characteristic that may render them slightly less likely to have as many children as their orgasmic counterparts.

Many people have been able to find effective relief from anorgasmia despite a physical factor; a mental process of conditioning such as hypnosis can have a positive impact.[citation needed] Primary male anorgasmia is very uncommon, and thus has been studied very little.[citation needed]
[edit] Secondary anorgasmia

Secondary anorgasmia is the loss of the ability to have orgasms.[dubious – discuss] The cause may be alcoholism, depression, grief, pelvic surgery or injuries, certain medications, illness, estrogen deprivation associated with menopause or an event that has violated the patient's sexual value system.

Secondary anorgasmia is close to 50% among males undergoing prostatectomy;[2] 80% among radical prostatectomies.[3] This is a serious adverse result because radical prostatectomies are usually given to younger males who are expected to live more than 10 years. At more advanced ages, the prostate is more unlikely to grow during that person's remaining lifetime.[1] This is generally caused by damage to the primary nerves serving the penile area, which pass near the prostate gland. Removal of the prostate frequently damages or even completely removes these nerves, making sexual response unreasonably difficult.[2]

Due to the existence of these nerves in the prostate, surgeons performing sex reassignment surgery on transsexual male to female patients avoid removing the prostate. This leaves the nerves that will then lead to the newly-formed clitoris, and decreases the chances that the patient will not respond to clitoral stimulation after surgery. Additionally, by leaving the prostate in the patient, the surgeon allows it to be situated close to the wall of the newly-formed vagina, which may potentially increase stimulation during vaginal intercourse after the procedure.
[edit] Situational anorgasmia

People who are orgasmic in some situations may not be in others. A person may have an orgasm from one type of stimulation but not from another. Or a person may achieve orgasm with one partner but not another, or have an orgasm only under certain conditions or only with a certain type or amount of foreplay. These common variations are within the range of normal sexual expression and should not be considered problematic.

A person who is troubled by experiencing situational anorgasmia should be encouraged to explore alone and with his or her partner those factors that may affect whether or not he or she is orgasmic, such as fatigue, emotional concerns, feeling pressured to have sex when he or she is not interested, or a partner's sexual dysfunction. In the relatively common case of female situational anorgasmia during penile-vaginal intercourse, some sex therapists recommend that couples incorporate manual or vibrator stimulation during intercourse, or using the female-above position as it may allow for greater stimulation of the clitoris by the penis or symphysis pubis or both, and it allows the woman better control of movement.
[edit] Random anorgasmia

Some people are orgasmic but not in enough instances to satisfy their sense of what is appropriate or desirable. Therapy can help such people examine and realign their expectations of orgasm and of sexual activity. For some people, therapy can help people become more comfortable with momentarily giving up control to bodily responses.
Treatment

Question book-new.svg
This article needs additional citations for verification.
Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2007)

Effective treatment for anorgasmia depends on the cause. In the case of women suffering from psychological sexual trauma or inhibition, psychosexual counselling might be advisable and could be obtained through GP referral.

Women suffering from anorgasmia with no obvious psychological cause would need to be examined by their GP to check for absence of disease. Blood tests would also need to be done (full blood count, liver function, oestradiol/estradiol, total testosterone, SHBG, FSH/LH, prolactin, thyroid function, lipids and fasting blood sugar) to check for other conditions such as diabetes, lack of ovulation, low thyroid function or hormone imbalances. They would then need to be referred to a consultant specialising in female sexual dysfunction.

Just as with erectile dysfunction in men, lack of sexual function in women may be treated with hormones to correct imbalances, clitoral vacuum pump devices or medication to improve blood flow and sexual sensation.

for mre information or treatment pl call
dr Vinod Raina
+91-9871605858
 

Sexual arousal disorder

Sexual arousal disorder

This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2008)

Sexual arousal disorder is generally defined as the inability to attain or maintain typical responses to sexual arousal. The disorder is found in the DSM-IV.

The term is often used in the diagnosis of women, while the term erectile dysfunction (ED) is often used for men.

Signs and symptoms

The symptoms of the disorder include:

* Lack of vaginal lubrication
* Lack of vaginal dilation or lengthening
* Decreased genital tumescence or swelling
* Decreased genital or nipple sensation

Contrary to popular belief, the disorder is not always caused from a lack of sexual arousal. Possible causes of sexual arousal disorder include psychological and emotional factors, such as depression, anger, and stress; relationship factors, such as conflict or lack of trust; and medical factors, such as depleted hormones, reduced regional blood flow, and nerve damage.
Diagnosis

It is, therefore, important for a licensed psychologist to first remove doubt of psychological or emotional problems, a trained sex therapist to then remove doubt of relationship concerns, and a medical doctor to further investigate medical causes.

Treatment

Depending on the cause of the disorder, hormone therapy or a blood-flow enhancing medication, like Viagra, may be appropriate.

A new medication, bremelanotide (formerly PT-141) increasing sexual desire in both male and female was in clinical tests until 2007. It was pulled from further testing due to adverse effects to the cardiovascular system.

FOR FURTHER SEXUAL AROUSAL DISORDERS PL CALL
Dr Vinod Raina
+91-9871605858
MD MEDICINE
 

sexual desire disorders

Sexual desire disorders material taken from wikepidia
for sexual disorders call dr vinod raina on 9871605858
Main article: Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder

Sexual desire disorders or decreased libido are characterised by a lack or absence for some period of time of sexual desire or libido for sexual activity or of sexual fantasies. The condition ranges from a general lack of sexual desire to a lack of sexual desire for the current partner. The condition may have started after a period of normal sexual functioning or the person may always have had no/low sexual desire.

The causes vary considerably, but include a possible decrease in the production of normal estrogen in women or testosterone in both men and women. Other causes may be aging, fatigue, pregnancy, medications (such as the SSRIs) or psychiatric conditions, such as depression and anxiety.[1] Loss of libido from SSRIs usually reverses after SSRIs are discontinued, but in some cases it does not. This has been called PSSD; however, this is not a classification that would be found in any current medical text. While a number of causes for low sexual desire are often cited, only some of these have ever been the object of empirical research. Many rely entirely on the impressions of therapists.[2]
[edit] Sexual arousal disorders

Sexual arousal disorders were previously known as frigidity in women and impotence in men, though these have now been replaced with less judgmental terms. Impotence is now known as erectile dysfunction, and frigidity has been replaced with a number of terms describing specific problems with, for example, desire or arousal.

For both men and women, these conditions can manifest themselves as an aversion to, and avoidance of, sexual contact with a partner. In men, there may be partial or complete failure to attain or maintain an erection, or a lack of sexual excitement and pleasure in sexual activity.

There may be medical causes to these disorders, such as decreased blood flow or lack of vaginal lubrication. Chronic disease can also contribute, as well as the nature of the relationship between the partners. Unlike disorders of orgasm, as the success of Viagra (sildenafil citrate) attests, most erectile disorders in men are primarily physical conditions.
[edit] Erectile dysfunction
Main article: Erectile dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction or impotence is a sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis. There are various underlying causes, such as damage to the nervi erigentes which prevents or delays erection, or diabetes, which simply decreases blood flow to the tissue in the penis, many of which are medically reversible.

The causes of erectile dysfunction may be psychological or physical. Psychological impotence can often be helped by almost anything that the patient believes in; there is a very strong placebo effect. Physical damage is much more severe. One leading physical cause of ED is continual or severe damage taken to the nervi erigentes. These nerves course beside the prostate arising from the sacral plexus and can be damaged in prostatic and colo-rectal surgeries.

Due to its embarrassing nature and the shame felt by sufferers, the subject was taboo for a long time, and is the subject of many urban legends. Folk remedies have long been advocated, with some being advertised widely since the 1930s. The introduction of perhaps the first pharmacologically effective remedy for impotence, sildenafil (trade name Viagra), in the 1990s caused a wave of public attention, propelled in part by the news-worthiness of stories about it and heavy advertising.

The Latin term impotentia coeundi describes simple inability to insert the penis into the vagina. It is now mostly replaced by more precise terms.
[edit] Orgasm disorders

Orgasm disorders are persistent delays or absence of orgasm following a normal sexual excitement phase. The disorder can occur in both women and men. The SSRI antidepressants may be the reason for the disorder, as they can delay orgasm or eliminate it entirely.
[edit] Sexual pain disorders

Sexual pain disorders affect women almost exclusively and are known as dyspareunia (painful intercourse) or vaginismus (an involuntary spasm of the muscles of the vaginal wall that interferes with intercourse).

Dyspareunia may be caused by insufficient lubrication (vaginal dryness) in women. Poor lubrication may result from insufficient excitement and stimulation, or from hormonal changes caused by menopause, pregnancy, or breast-feeding. Irritation from contraceptive creams and foams can also cause dryness, as can fear and anxiety about sex.

It is unclear exactly what causes vaginismus, but it is thought that past sexual trauma (such as rape or abuse) may play a role. Another female sexual pain disorder is called vulvodynia or vulvar vestibulitis. In this condition, women experience burning pain during sex which seems to be related to problems with the skin in the vulvar and vaginal areas. The cause is unknown.
[edit] General

Sexual dysfunctions are more common in the early adult years, with the majority of people seeking care for such conditions during their late twenties through thirties. The incidence increases again in the geriatric population, typically with gradual onset of symptoms that are associated most commonly with medical causes of sexual dysfunction.

Sexual dysfunction is more common in people who abuse alcohol and drugs. It is also more likely in people suffering from diabetes and degenerative neurological disorders. Ongoing psychological problems, difficulty maintaining relationships or chronic disharmony with the current sexual partner can also interfere with sexual function.
[edit] Causes

There are many factors which may result in a person experiencing a sexual dysfunction. These may result from emotional or physical causes.

Sexual dysfunction may arise from emotional factors, including interpersonal or psychological problems. Interpersonal problems may arise from marital or relationship problems, or from a lack of trust and open communication between partners, and psychological problems may be the result of depression, sexual fears or guilt, past sexual trauma, sexual disorders,[3] among others.

Sexual dysfunction is especially common among people who have anxiety disorders. Ordinary anxiousness can obviously cause erectile dysfunction in men without psychiatric problems, but clinically diagnosable disorders such as panic disorder commonly cause avoidance of intercourse and premature ejaculation. Pain during intercourse is often a comorbidity of anxiety disorders among women. [1]

Sexual activity may also be impacted by physical factors. These would include use of drugs, such as alcohol, nicotine, narcotics, stimulants, antihypertensives, antihistamines, and some psychotherapeutic drugs.[4] For women, almost any physiological change that affects the reproductive system—premenstrual syndrome, pregnancy, postpartum, menopause—can have an adverse effect on libido. [4] Injuries to the back may also impact sexual activity, as would problems with an enlarged prostate gland, problems with blood supply, nerve damage (as in spinal cord injuries). Disease, such as diabetic neuropathy, multiple sclerosis, tumors, and, rarely, tertiary syphilis may also impact on the activity, as would failure of various organ systems (such as the heart and lungs), endocrine disorders (thyroid, pituitary, or adrenal gland problems), hormonal deficiencies (low testosterone, estrogen, or androgens), and some birth defects.
[edit] Symptoms
[edit] Psychological sexual disorders

The fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders lists the following psychological sexual disorders:

* Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (see also asexuality, which is not classified as a disorder)
* Bestiality
* Sexual aversion disorder (avoidance of or lack of desire for sexual intercourse)
* Female sexual arousal disorder (failure of normal lubricating arousal response)
* Male erectile disorder
* Female orgasmic disorder (see Anorgasmia)
* Male orgasmic disorder (see Anorgasmia)
* Premature ejaculation
* Dyspareunia
* Vaginismus
* Paraphilias
* PTSD due to genital mutilation or childhood sexual abuse
* anhedonia

[edit] Other sexual problems

* Sexual dissatisfaction (non-specific)
* Lack of sexual desire
* Anorgasmia
* Impotence
* Sexually transmitted diseases
* Delay or absence of ejaculation, despite adequate stimulation
* Inability to control timing of ejaculation
* Inability to relax vaginal muscles enough to allow intercourse
* Inadequate vaginal lubrication preceding and during intercourse
* Burning pain on the vulva or in the vagina with contact to those areas
* Unhappiness or confusion related to sexual orientation
* Transsexual and transgender people may have sexual problems (before or after surgery), though actually being transgendered or transsexual is not a sexual problem in itself.
* Persistent sexual arousal syndrome
* Post SSRI Sexual Dysfunction
* Sexual addiction
* Hypersexuality
* Female genital cutting

[edit] Other related problems

* Infertility
* Paraphilia

[edit] Treatment for females

Although there are no approved pharmaceuticals for addressing female sexual disorders, several are under investigation for their effectiveness.[5] A vacuum device is the only approved medical device for arousal and orgasm disorders. It is designed to increase blood flow to the clitoris and external genitalia.[5] Women experiencing pain with intercourse are often prescribed pain relievers or desensitizing agents. Others are prescribed lubricants and/or hormone therapy.[5] Many patients with female sexual dysfunction are often also referred to a counselor or therapist for psychosocial counseling.[5]

A manual physical therapy, the Wurn Technique, which is designed to reduce pelvic and vaginal adhesion, may also be beneficial for women experiencing sexual pain and dysfunction. In a controlled study, Increasing orgasm and decreasing intercourse pain by a manual physical therapy technique, [6] twenty-three (23) women reporting painful intercourse and/or sexual dysfunction received a 20-hour program of manipulative physical therapy. The results were compared using the validated Female Sexual Function Index, with post-test vs. pretest scores. Results of therapy showed improvements in all six recognized domains of sexual dysfunction. The results were significant (P .001), arousal (P = .0033), lubrication (P < .001), orgasm (P < .001), satisfaction (P < .001), and pain (P < .001). A second study to improve sexual function in patients with endometriosis showed similar statistical results. [7]
[edit] Clinical studies

The earliest attempts at treating sexual dysfunctions, especially erectile dysfunction, date back to Muslim physicians and pharmacists in the medieval Islamic world. They were the first to prescribe medication for the treatment of this problem, and they developed several methods of therapy for this issue, including a single-drug therapy method where a drug was prescribed and a "combination method of either a drug or food." Most of these drugs were oral medication, though a few patients were also treated through topical and transurethral means. Sexual dysfunctions were being treated with clinically tested drugs in the Islamic world since the 9th century until the 16th century by a number of Muslim physicians and pharmacists, including Muhammad ibn Zakarīya Rāzi, Thabit bin Qurra, Ibn Al-Jazzar, Avicenna (The Canon of Medicine), Averroes, Ibn al-Baitar, and Ibn al-Nafis (The Comprehensive Book on Medicine).[8]

In modern times, the genuine clinical study of sexual problems is usually dated back no further than 1970 when Masters and Johnson's Human Sexual Inadequacy was published. It was the result of over a decade of work at the Reproductive Biology Research Foundation in St. Louis, involving 790 cases. The work grew from Masters and Johnson's earlier Human Sexual Response (1966).

Prior to Masters and Johnson the clinical approach to sexual problems was largely derived from the thinking of Freud. It was held with psychopathology and approached with a certain pessimism regarding the chance of help or improvement. Sexual problems were merely symptoms of a deeper malaise and the diagnostic approach was from the psychopathological. There was little distinction between difficulties in function and variations nor between perversion and problems. Despite work by psychotherapists such as Balint sexual difficulties were crudely split into frigidity or impotence, terms which too soon acquired negative connotations in popular culture.

The achievement of Human Sexual Inadequacy was to move thinking from psychopathology to learning, only if a problem did not respond to educative treatment would psychopathological problems be considered. Also treatment was directed at couples, whereas before partners would be seen individually. Masters and Johnson saw that sex was a joint act. They believed that sexual communication was the key issue to sexual problems not the specifics of an individual problem. They also proposed co-therapy, a matching pair of therapists to the clients, arguing that a lone male therapist could not fully comprehend female difficulties and vice versa.

The basic Masters and Johnson treatment program was an intensive two week program to develop efficient sexual communication. Couple-based and therapist led the program began with discussion and then sensate focus between the couple to develop shared experiences. From the experiences specific difficulties could be determined and approached with a specific therapy. In a limited number of male only cases (41) Masters and Johnson had developed the use of a female surrogate, an approach they soon abandoned over the ethical, legal and other problems it raised.

In defining the range of sexual problems Masters and Johnson defined a boundary between dysfunction and deviations. Dysfunctions were transitory and experienced by the majority of people, dysfunctions bounded male primary or secondary impotence, premature ejaculation, ejaculatory incompetence; female primary orgasmic dysfunction and situational orgasmic dysfunction; pain during intercourse (dyspareunia) and vaginismus. According to Masters and Johnson sexual arousal and climax are a normal physiological process of every functionally intact adult, but despite being autonomic it can be inhibited. Masters and Johnson treatment program for dysfunction was 81.1% successful.

Despite the work of Masters and Johnson the field in the US was quickly over-run by ethusiastic rather than systematic approaches, blurring the space between 'enrichment' and therapy. Although it has been argued that the impact of the work was such that it would be impossible to repeat such a clean experiment.
[edit] See also

* Sexual function for information about assessing sexual dysfunction
* Sexual arousal disorder
* Female sexual arousal disorder
* Post SSRI Sexual Dysfunction
* Agony aunt
* Anorgasmia
* Premature ejaculation
* Dapoxetine
* Sexless marriage

[edit] References

1. ^ a b Coretti G and Baldi I (August 1, 2007). "The Relationship Between Anxiety Disorders and Sexual Dysfunction". Psychiatric Times 24 (9). http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/anxiety/article/10168/54881.
2. ^ Maurice, William (2007): “Sexual Desire Disorders in Men.” in ed. Leiblum, Sandra: Principles and Practice of Sex Therapy (4th ed.) The Guilford Press. New York
3. ^ Michetti, Paolo Maria; Roberta Rossi, Daniele Bonanno, Andrea Tiesi and Chiara Simonelli (2006). "Male sexuality and regulation of emotions: a study on the association between alexithymia and erectile dysfunction (ED)". International Journal of Impotence Research 18 (2): 170–174. doi:10.1038/sj.ijir.3901386. PMID 16151475. http://www.nature.com/ijir/journal/v18/n2/full/3901386a.html. Retrieved 2007-02-02.
4. ^ a b Saks BR (April 15, 2008). "Common issues in female sexual dysfunction". Psychiatric Times 25 (5). http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/sexual-issues/article/10168/1153918.
5. ^ a b c d Amato P, MD. An update on therapeutic approaches to female sexual dysfunction [1]. 2007. Retrieved August 14, 2008.
6. ^ Wurn LJ, Wurn BF, King CR, Roscow AS, Scharf ES, Shuster JJ. Increasing Orgasm and Decreasing Dyspareunia by a Manual Physical Therapy Technique. Med Gen Med 2004 Dec 14; 6(4): 47. PMID 15775874.
7. ^ Wurn LJ, Wurn BF, King CR, Roscow AS, Scharf ES, Shuster JJ. Improving sexual function in patients with endometriosis via a pelvic physical therapy. Fertil Steril. 2006; 86 (Supp 2): S29-30. Abstract.
8. ^ A. Al Dayela and N. al-Zuhair (2006), "Single drug therapy in the treatment of male sexual/erectile dysfunction in Islamic medicine", Urology 68 (1), p. 253-254.

[edit] Further reading

* Kaplan, Helen Singer, The New Sex Therapy: Active Treatment Of Sexual Dysfunctions, New York, Brunner/Mazel, 1974. ISBN 0876300832

[edit] External links

* International Society for Sexual Medicine
* NIH site on sexual problems
* 100 FAQs about sexual dysfunction
* "PEhomepage.com - treatments for premature ejaculation" - an article on dapoxetine
* "Premature Ejaculation Drug Promising"
* "The many mysteries of the female orgasm" - An editorial about advances in sexual pharmacology
* Vaginimus Awareness Network: A non-profit site offering facts and advice to women with vaginismus, their partners and gynaecologists
* Sexual Dysfunction Research Community
* homepage for Premature Ejaculation patients
* Traumatic Masturbatory Syndrome and other masturbation issues
* Sexual Medicine Society of North America's website: SexHealthMatters.org
* Persistent Sexual Arousal Syndrome - Language: Dutch and English

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sexual dysfunction,sex problems,erectile problems

A sexual problem, or sexual dysfunction, refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. The sexual response cycle has four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

While research suggests that sexual dysfunction is common (43% of women and 31% of men report some degree of difficulty), it is a topic that many people are hesitant to discuss. Fortunately, most cases of sexual dysfunction are treatable, so it is important to share your concerns with your partner and doctor.

What causes sexual problems?
Sexual dysfunction can be a result of a physical or psychological problem.

* Physical causes -- Many physical and/or medical conditions can cause problems with sexual function. These conditions include diabetes, heart and vascular (blood vessel) disease, neurological disorders, hormonal imbalances, chronic diseases such as kidney or liver failure, and alcoholism and drug abuse. In addition, the side effects of certain medications, including some antidepressant drugs, can affect sexual desire and function.
* Psychological causes -- These include work-related stress and anxiety, concern about sexual performance, marital or relationship problems, depression, feelings of guilt, and the effects of a past sexual trauma.
Who is affected by sexual problems?
Both men and women are affected by sexual problems. Sexual problems occur in adults of all ages. Among those commonly affected are those in the geriatric population, which may be related to a decline in health associated with aging.

How do sexual problems affect men?
The most common sexual problems in men are ejaculation disorders, erectile dysfunction, and inhibited sexual desire.

What are ejaculation disorders?
There are different types of ejaculation disorders, including:

* Premature ejaculation -- This refers to ejaculation that occurs before or soon after penetration.
* Inhibited or retarded ejaculation -- This is when ejaculation is slow to occur.
* Retrograde ejaculation -- This occurs when, at orgasm, the ejaculate is forced back into the bladder rather than through the urethra and out the end of the penis.

In some cases, premature and inhibited ejaculation are caused by a lack of attraction for a partner, past traumatic events and psychological factors, including a strict religious background that causes the person to view sex as sinful. Premature ejaculation, the most common form of sexual dysfunction in men, often is due to nervousness over how well he will perform during sex. Certain drugs, including some anti-depressants, may affect ejaculation, as can nerve damage to the spinal cord or back.

Retrograde ejaculation is common in males with diabetes who suffer from diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage). This is due to problems with the nerves in the bladder and the bladder neck that allow the ejaculate to flow backward and into the bladder. In other men, retrograde ejaculation occurs after operations on the bladder neck or prostate, or after certain abdominal operations. In addition, certain medications, particularly those used to treat mood disorders, may cause problems with ejaculation. This generally does not require treatment unless it impairs fertili

What is erectile dysfunction?
Also known as impotence, erectile dysfunction is defined as the inability to attain and/or maintain an erection suitable for intercourse. Causes of erectile dysfunction include diseases affecting blood flow, such as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries); nerve disorders; psychological factors, such as stress, depression, and performance anxiety (nervousness over his ability to sexually perform); and injury to the penis. Chronic illness, certain medications, and a condition called Peyronie's disease (scar tissue in the penis) also can cause erectile dysfunction.

What is inhibited sexual desire?
Inhibited desire, or loss of libido, refers to a decrease in desire for, or interest in sexual activity. Reduced libido can result from physical or psychological factors. It has been associated with low levels of the hormone testosterone. It also may be caused by psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression; medical illnesses, such as diabetes and high blood pressure; certain medications, including some anti-depressants; and relationship difficulties.

How Are Male Sexual Problems Diagnosed?
The doctor likely will begin with a thorough history of symptoms. He or she may order other tests to rule out any medical problems that may be contributing to the dysfunction. The doctor may refer you to other doctors, including a urologist (a doctor specializing in the urinary tract and male reproductive system), an endocrinologist (a doctor specializing in glandular disorders), a neurologist (a doctor specializing in disorders of the nervous system), sex therapists and other counselors

What tests are used to evaluate sexual problems?

Several tests can be used to evaluate the causes and extent of sexual problems. They include:

* Blood tests -- These tests are done to evaluate hormone levels.
* Vascular assessment -- This involves an evaluation of the blood flow to the penis. A blockage in a blood vessel supplying blood to the penis may be contributing to erectile dysfunction.
* Sensory testing -- Particularly useful in evaluating the effects of diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage), sensory testing measures the strength of nerve impulses in a particular area of the body.
* Nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing -- This test is used to monitor erections that occur naturally during sleep. This test can help determine if a man's erectile problems are due to physical or psychological causes.

How is male sexual dysfunction treated?
Many cases of sexual dysfunction can be corrected by treating the underlying physical or psychological problems. Treatment strategies may include the following:

* Medical treatment -- This involves treatment of any physical problem that may be contributing to a man's sexual dysfunction.
* Medications -- Medications, such as Cialis, Viagra or Levitra , may help improve sexual function in men by increasing blood flow to the penis.
* Hormones -- Men with low levels of testosterone may benefit from hormone supplementation (testosterone replacement therapy).
* Psychological therapy -- Therapy with a trained counselor can help a person address feelings of anxiety, fear or guilt that may have an impact on sexual function.
* Mechanical aids -- Aids such as vacuum devices and penile implants may help men with erectile dysfunction.
* Education and communication -- Education about sex and sexual behaviors and responses may help a man overcome his anxieties about sexual performance. Open dialogue with your partner about your needs and concerns also helps to overcome many barriers to a healthy sex life.

Can sexual problems be cured?
The success of treatment for sexual dysfunction depends on the underlying cause of the problem. The outlook is good for dysfunction that is related to a treatable or reversible physical condition. Mild dysfunction that is related to stress, fear, or anxiety often can be successfully treated with counseling, education, and improved communication between partners.

Can sexual problems be prevented?
While sexual problems cannot be prevented, dealing with the underlying causes of the dysfunction can help you better understand and cope with the problem when it occurs. There are some things you can do to help maintain good sexual function:

* Follow your doctor's treatment plan for any medical/health conditions.
* Limit your alcohol intake.
* Quit smoking.
* Deal with any emotional or psychological issues such as stress, depression, and anxiety. Get treatment as needed.
* Increase communication with your partner.

When should I call my doctor?
Many men experience a problem with sexual function from time to time. However, when the problems are persistent, they can cause distress for the man and his partner, and have a negative impact on their relationship. If you consistently experience sexual function problems, see your doctor for evaluation and treatment.

Reviewed by the doctors at The Cleveland Clinic Urological Institute.

Featured: Sexual (Sex) Problems in Men Main Article
Male sexual dysfunction can be caused by physical or psychological problems. Common sexual problems in men include erectile dysfunction (impotence or ED), premature ejaculation and loss of libido. Treatment for sexual dysfunction in men may involve medication, hormone therapy, psychological therapy, and the use of mechanical aids.
Medications

* sildenafil, Viagra

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Glossary

* Sexual (Sex) Problems in Men Glossary

if u feel any problem pl feel free to call me on +91 9871605858
dr vinod raina
md internal medicine

Saturday, June 14, 2008

  Introduction

A sexual problem, or sexual dysfunction, refers to a problem during any phase of the sexual response cycle that prevents the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. The sexual response cycle has four phases: excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution.

While research suggests that sexual dysfunction is common (43% of women and 31% of men report some degree of difficulty), it is a topic that many people are hesitant to discuss. Fortunately, most cases of sexual dysfunction are treatable, so it is important to share your concerns with your partner and doctor.

What causes sexual problems?

Sexual dysfunction can be a result of a physical or psychological problem.

* Physical causes -- Many physical and/or medical conditions can cause problems with sexual function. These conditions include diabetes, heart and vascular (blood vessel) disease, neurological disorders, hormonal imbalances, chronic diseases such as kidney or liver failure, and alcoholism and drug abuse. In addition, the side effects of certain medications, including some antidepressant drugs, can affect sexual desire and function.
* Psychological causes -- These include work-related stress and anxiety, concern about sexual performance, marital or relationship problems, depression, feelings of guilt, and the effects of a past sexual trauma.



Who is affected by sexual problems?

Both men and women are affected by sexual problems. Sexual problems occur in adults of all ages. Among those commonly affected are those in the geriatric population, which may be related to a decline in health associated with aging.

How do sexual problems affect men?

The most common sexual problems in men are ejaculation disorders, erectile dysfunction, and inhibited sexual desire.

What are ejaculation disorders?

There are different types of ejaculation disorders, including:

* Premature ejaculation -- This refers to ejaculation that occurs before or soon after penetration.
* Inhibited or retarded ejaculation -- This is when ejaculation is slow to occur.
* Retrograde ejaculation -- This occurs when, at orgasm, the ejaculate is forced back into the bladder rather than through the urethra and out the end of the penis.

In some cases, premature and inhibited ejaculation are caused by a lack of attraction for a partner, past traumatic events and psychological factors, including a strict religious background that causes the person to view sex as sinful. Premature ejaculation, the most common form of sexual dysfunction in men, often is due to nervousness over how well he will perform during sex. Certain drugs, including some anti-depressants, may affect ejaculation, as can nerve damage to the spinal cord or back.

Retrograde ejaculation is common in males with diabetes who suffer from diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage). This is due to problems with the nerves in the bladder and the bladder neck that allow the ejaculate to flow backward and into the bladder. In other men, retrograde ejaculation occurs after operations on the bladder neck or prostate, or after certain abdominal operations. In addition, certain medications, particularly those used to treat mood disorders, may cause problems with ejaculation. This generally does not require treatment unless it impairs fertility.



What is erectile dysfunction?

Also known as impotence, erectile dysfunction is defined as the inability to attain and/or maintain an erection suitable for intercourse. Causes of erectile dysfunction include diseases affecting blood flow, such as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries); nerve disorders; psychological factors, such as stress, depression, and performance anxiety (nervousness over his ability to sexually perform); and injury to the penis. Chronic illness, certain medications, and a condition called Peyronie's disease (scar tissue in the penis) also can cause erectile dysfunction.

What is inhibited sexual desire?

Inhibited desire, or loss of libido, refers to a decrease in desire for, or interest in sexual activity. Reduced libido can result from physical or psychological factors. It has been associated with low levels of the hormone testosterone. It also may be caused by psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression; medical illnesses, such as diabetes and high blood pressure; certain medications, including some anti-depressants; and relationship difficulties.

How Are Male Sexual Problems Diagnosed?

The doctor likely will begin with a thorough history of symptoms. He or she may order other tests to rule out any medical problems that may be contributing to the dysfunction. The doctor may refer you to other doctors, including a urologist (a doctor specializing in the urinary tract and male reproductive system), an endocrinologist (a doctor specializing in glandular disorders), a neurologist (a doctor specializing in disorders of the nervous system), sex therapists and other counselors.



What tests are used to evaluate sexual problems?

Several tests can be used to evaluate the causes and extent of sexual problems. They include:

* Blood tests -- These tests are done to evaluate hormone levels.
* Vascular assessment -- This involves an evaluation of the blood flow to the penis. A blockage in a blood vessel supplying blood to the penis may be contributing to erectile dysfunction.
* Sensory testing -- Particularly useful in evaluating the effects of diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage), sensory testing measures the strength of nerve impulses in a particular area of the body.
* Nocturnal penile tumescence and rigidity testing -- This test is used to monitor erections that occur naturally during sleep. This test can help determine if a man's erectile problems are due to physical or psychological causes.

How is male sexual dysfunction treated?

Many cases of sexual dysfunction can be corrected by treating the underlying physical or psychological problems. Treatment strategies may include the following:

* Medical treatment -- This involves treatment of any physical problem that may be contributing to a man's sexual dysfunction.
* Medications -- Medications, such as Cialis, Viagra or Levitra , may help improve sexual function in men by increasing blood flow to the penis.
* Hormones -- Men with low levels of testosterone may benefit from hormone supplementation (testosterone replacement therapy).
* Psychological therapy -- Therapy with a trained counselor can help a person address feelings of anxiety, fear or guilt that may have an impact on sexual function.
* Mechanical aids -- Aids such as vacuum devices and penile implants may help men with erectile dysfunction.
* Education and communication -- Education about sex and sexual behaviors and responses may help a man overcome his anxieties about sexual performance. Open dialogue with your partner about your needs and concerns also helps to overcome many barriers to a healthy sex life.


Can sexual problems be cured?

The success of treatment for sexual dysfunction depends on the underlying cause of the problem. The outlook is good for dysfunction that is related to a treatable or reversible physical condition. Mild dysfunction that is related to stress, fear, or anxiety often can be successfully treated with counseling, education, and improved communication between partners.

Can sexual problems be prevented?

While sexual problems cannot be prevented, dealing with the underlying causes of the dysfunction can help you better understand and cope with the problem when it occurs. There are some things you can do to help maintain good sexual function:

* Follow your doctor's treatment plan for any medical/health conditions.
* Limit your alcohol intake.
* Quit smoking.
* Deal with any emotional or psychological issues such as stress, depression, and anxiety. Get treatment as needed.
* Increase communication with your partner.

When should I call my doctor?

Many men experience a problem with sexual function from time to time. However, when the problems are persistent, they can cause distress for the man and his partner, and have a negative impact on their relationship. If you consistently experience sexual function problems, see your doctor for evaluation and treatment.